Volume 6, Issue 3, September 2018, Page: 57-71
Chime’s Laws for Distribution of Planets, Moons and Planetary Ring-Systems: Critical Examination of Their Predictions and the Implications
Chime Peter Ekpunobi, Department of Theoretical Astronomy, Charles-Monica Observatory, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Internal Medicine, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Medicine, ESUT Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
Received: Aug. 5, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 22, 2018;       Published: Oct. 15, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajaa.20180603.12      View  317      Downloads  13
Abstract
Study Aim: The problem as to whether planets, moons and planetary ring-systems are randomly or non-randomly distributed in the solar system has not been resolved. In this article, the predictions of Chime’s laws for distribution of bodies were critically examined in order to see if planets, moons and planetary ring-systems were randomly or non-randomly distributed in the solar system. Method: Equations formulated based on the distribution of the known planets, moons and planetary ring-systems in the solar system, were used to predict the distribution of these bodies in all the planetary orbits of the solar system. The predictions made by those equations were then compared with observations. Result: The solar system is a 14-orbit system which has between 9 and 13 formed planets, between 190 and 248 formed moons and 6 planetary ring-systems. Many Jupiter’s moons are missing. About three Uranus’ moons await discovery. Pluto is Planet 10 which was predicted to have 6 moons and a planetary ring-system. Planet Eleven, predicted to have 2 moons and a planetary ring-system, has not yet been discovered. The non-random distribution of planets, moons and planetary ring-systems in the solar system favoured a formation process that was not prone to chance. There are serious flaws in the IAU definition of planet, which was why it was unable to recognize that Pluto is a Planet. Conclusion: This study has shown that planets, moons and planetary ring-systems are non-randomly distributed in the solar system. The simplicity, elegance and Fibonacci-friendliness of the beta total orbital bodies distribution laws make them very attractive. No standard ring-system or any more moons are expected to be discovered in Section 2.1.1 of the solar system. Astronomers should, therefore, channel their energies and limited resources towards Section 2.1.2 of the solar system where it is necessary to resolve such puzzles as the number of Jupiter’s moons that are actually missing, the group of laws that is operative in the solar system and the fate of Warsawlene, the sixth moon of Pluto. There are serious flaws in the 2006 IAU definition of planet. Systematic theoretical explorations of Division 2.2 should commence with Orbit Eleven and its planet. Recommendations: Search for the three undiscovered moons of Uranus labeled Ezechi, Akanene and Ikechukwu in the order in which they will be discovered; search for the sixth moon of Pluto, Warsawlene; recognizing the planetary status of Pluto; serious efforts to discover Planet Eleven; and coming up with a new and better definition of planet.
Keywords
Chime’s Laws, Total Orbital Bodies, Planet-Moon Bodies, Distribution of Planets, Distribution of Moons, Distribution of Ring-Systems
To cite this article
Chime Peter Ekpunobi, Chime’s Laws for Distribution of Planets, Moons and Planetary Ring-Systems: Critical Examination of Their Predictions and the Implications, American Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 57-71. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaa.20180603.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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